35 Comments

Sounds like an important book. Thx for the recommend.

I’ve been on a self improvement journey for many years. The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle was the first wild inspiration. Recently I read and would recommend The Power of Love by James Van Praugh and Breaking the habit of Being Yourself by Dr Joe Dispenza. The book that healed my back pain— yes a book not a drug— was The Divided Mind by Dr John Sarno.

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Nice! Seems like it's worth checking out - the stages reminded me of the 4 stages of life in Hindu philosophy, the "ashramas" (that my Friday story will touch upon as well...) Feel like there are so many themes of my life I'm only now uncovering in my 50s...that I've not paid attention to so far. Something about the "vanaprastha" ashram forces long awaited reflection...

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I discovered, quite on my own, Thoreau’s Walden, Wendell Berry’s What Are People For?, and John Muir’s My First Summer in the Sierras, all of which taught me how to live a good life, a process more about going in a direction worthy of the precious gift of life, rather than simply sitting atop of a tall pole to rid my soul of its inevitable evil.

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Nov 29, 2023·edited Nov 29, 2023Liked by Priya Iyer

I remember being a kid and thinking that adults were these people who had it all figured out — how wrong I was haha.

You totally sold me on this book, Priya!

I’m looking forward to reading it.

Thanks :)

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Reflections on the Art of Living: Joseph Campbell.

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I can't recall a specific book that stood out to me, but during my teenage years, I was into Herman Hesse's works, and my first venture into self-help was with Og Mandino. The most significant life lessons, however, came from the challenges of adulthood.

Currently, I'm delving into Arnold Schwarzenegger's "Be Useful," which aligns with its docuseries. I appreciate how Schwarzenegger reflects on the highs and lows of his life, extracting valuable lessons along the way. It's a practical and insightful take on navigating life's experiences.

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I like the idea of a handbook for how to be an adult. And also, I don't. We all need help. But I think we all need to live life as if nobody had ever done it before.

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Thanks for this reminder, Priya! I have had this book on my shelf for years. Time to read! My son, at 21, is what we call a "young adult," which seems like a relatively new term. Maybe I'll give him this book. 😊

As for recommendations I'm reading James Hollis, "Living an Examined Life: Wisdom for the Second Half of the Journey." It's in short chapters, great bedtime reading. Earlier, Debbie Ford's "The Dark Side of the Light Chasers" was an excellent intro to shadow work. I also love Anne Lamott's books - "Traveling Mercies," "Bird By Bird," really all of them. Her humor lightens even the most difficult subjects. My very agnostic mother and I read together, "Help, Thanks, Wow," when she was dying.

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Thanks for this. The title rang a bell, and I was able to find a copy in my husband’s bookshelves. Seems like a good reading/thinking project for me, for the end of year transition. He also has a copy of How to Be an Adult in Relationships, which I was happy to see. :)

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