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"Because it felt like the dragon had a message for me, I cautiously tried a little active imagination. I remember thinking of the dragon and wishing if only I had some of the dragon's power and strength, and almost immediately, something shifted within me and the imaginal dragon answered: You have me. I am inside you." I really liked this passage, especially the part about " cautiously tried a little active imagination", which seems like a really great approach to the problem.

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What a coincidence that I too dreamt about a dragon recently! Hah. Love these poignant lines, Priya: "I realized the dream dragon felt protective and intimidating, both a wall and a ceiling. I couldn't see what lay beyond the dragon. So, it was also a threshold."

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Hi Priya, as you know, I love your writing, and I'm so enjoying how deep you're digging into Joseph Campbell's work. However, I'm still not convinced that the Hero's Journey is helpful for women. I have a sense that it's part of the old patriarchal hierarchies that are crumbling around us as we ease into this new era of Conscious Balancing of the divine feminine and sacred masculine energies within us all.

When Campbell talks about the father being "the initiating priest through whom the young being passes on into the larger world," I can see how this is applicable to the *father-son* relationship - as with Luke in Star Wars. And as you have probably read too, George Lucas was apparently good friends with Joseph Campbell.

But don't you think the *father-daughter* relationship is different? I often wonder if perhaps with the father-daughter relationship, behind the idealized image of a personal father stands the divine father... which also makes me wonder how the Rising of the Divine Feminine plays into the Hero's Journey...

Do you know of Sharon Blackie's work? You may find this interesting too: The Post-Heroic Journey, An antidote to the all-conquering Hero https://sharonblackie.substack.com/p/the-post-heroic-journey

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Priya, this was so interesting!

The story of your dream and the dragon and what it represented for you in the real world tied in so well to Campbell’s idea about transcending the shadow of our father/father-figure.

It really got me thinking about my experiences with my dad in my 20s and how we butted up against each other in a less than healthy way sometimes and how I both sought his approval and also wanted to do my own thing. It’s powerful to have concepts like this to help make sense of these experiences.

Thanks for sharing :)

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Priya, the timing of this is amazing. At the beginning, reading your dream-image, I thought (Jungian that I am), that dragon is *you*! I love that active imagination showed you that. What a visitation! I also thought of the dreams I’ve been having of a powerful, influential mentor I had recently whose rejection I’m still healing from. For me, that dragon is that mentor, so your words hit home. “I was terrified of disappointing them even as I knew it was time for me to emerge from their shadow and try something new.” It takes courage and imagination to transform a flawed human with power over me (power that I gave them) into an evolved inner resource to fuel what’s next for me. Thank you for this reminder.

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Hallo Priya. Two paragraphs stand out for me. "The Dragon is within", and "At-One-Ment". Like most kids, I was familiar with the portrayal of Dragons. Then our local Policeman introduced the Concept of them being real, which kinda stuck with me. are they perhaps demons or saviours, and in which reality anyway ? That they populate the writings of all nations raises curiosity, perhaps as metaphors or legends. Eventually I created a huge sculpture of a Dragon for the UK Olympic Torch Route. That in turn led to a bunch of writers submitting stories to me. Real or not, Dragons are within us, and have meaning for us. N'est ce pas ? Peace, Maurice

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